Find Your Voice & Tell Your Story

 

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Find Your Voice & Tell Your Story

February 25 @ 5:00 PM 6:30 PM

In this four-session online workshop, participants find their literary voice and tell the unique, authentic story of their disability journey, and what it means. Storytelling is an essential component of liberation and this workshop will help each person write their succinct and powerful story in a way only they can tell it.

Four participants will receive a $50 scholarship for their participation, with the possibility of an additional $25 if they attend all four workshop sessions.

Register here

Accessibility Information: Auto generated captioning will be available on Zoom. For further accessibility information or to request additional accommodations, please contact Emily at eholme@saic.edu. We kindly request two weeks notice for other accommodations.

More about this workshop series:

All people with disabilities have been through some sort of therapy. What is your therapy experience? Was it empowering? Was it oppressive? The world needs to hear the stories of people with disabilities– the joy and pain, the satisfaction and outrage, the humor. Relating our therapy stories is a good way to dig deep into the disability experience.

Week One: Introduction. What’s your therapy story? Why and how would you like to write about it? What is your voice? Writers receive exercises and writing prompts if necessary.

Week Two: Story sharing and constructive critiques.

Week Three: What’s your therapy story? Why and how would you like to write about it? What is your voice? Writers receive exercises and writing prompts if necessary.

Week Four: Refine and finalize stories.

Facilitator Bios:

Mike Ervin is a writer, humorist and activist living in Chicago. As journalist, his writing has been published in everything from Jobber and Warehouse Executive magazine to the New York Times. He is a regular columnist for The Progressive and New Mobility magazines. Mike is also sole proprietor of the blog Smart Ass Cripple. As a playwright, Mike’s work has been produced in theaters across the U.S. Mike has also been active for decades in the disability rights organization ADAPT. He helped found the Chicago ADAPT chapter and he has been arrested more than 20 times for civil disobedience.

Emily Holmes is a multidisciplinary artist and a Master of Art Therapy and Counseling Candidate at the Art Institute of Chicago. She is an intern at Disability Culture Activism Lab (DCAL).


This workshop is sponsored and made possible by the Arts & Culture Project at Access Living and DCAL at the Department of Art Therapy and Counseling, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

This program is partially supported by a grant from the Illinois Arts Council Agency.